Sometimes I get angry…

and this is one of those times…

You see, an email just landed in my inbox from a concerned student.  He saw an ad for a book that was titled From Credit Repair to Credit Millionaire by Donna Fox
“From credit ****** to credit millionaire”
and was concerned that someone was violating my copyright.

He’s close. While the content of the book is totally different (and, incidentally, has very little to do with credit or anything else, for that matter), the title directly violates a trademark I hold on the words “credit millionaire”.

The worst part is, the author was misguided.  Someone had told him that the phrase “credit millionaire” was commonplace and couldn’t be protected.

Can you believe it?  “Credit Millionaire” is a common phrase?  I made it up.  I created it!  It doesn’t have meaning other than what I’ve assigned to it.

Really.  Do a google search for “credit millionaire”

Here, I did it for you…
http://www.google.com/search?q=%22credit+millionaire%22&hl=en&lr=&start=0&sa=N

I had to get to page 5 before I found a reference that wasn’t to my book or the
credit millionaire home study course.

Other than being a violation of federal trademark law, this guy’s actions are
just plain stupid.

It doesn’t make sense to copy someone else’s brand, no matter how good it is.
It weakens your credibility and is simply bad business.

He bothered to get some (bad) advice to learn that “credit millionaire” wasn’t protectible when he registered his website three months ago.

So he specifically set out to steal the brand.
Can you believe it?

I guess I can.  After all, it’s the reason we look to the federal government to provide copyright and trademark protection for our intellectual property.

Obviously, I thought someone might try to take it.  It’s why I trademarked it in the first place.

But it still makes me angry.  No, not angry, sad.

Sad that someone would intentionally try and hurt me.  Sad that he doesn’t have an original idea of his own, and sad for all the people who might be confused
and think they are getting the quality and value behind the credit millionaire name, and instead get crap.

Protect yourself and your assets.
Trademark your brand.
Copyright your works.

And ultimately, when it comes to the authority on credit,

Accept No Imitations.

Bountiful borrowing,
Donna Fox

The Original Credit Millionaire

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